2014 Biennial Exhibition Opens at CMCA

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The Center for Maine Contemporary Art’s 2014 Biennial Exhibition opens Saturday, September 27, with an artists’ reception from 4 to 6:00 p.m. The reception is free and open to the public, and will take place at CMCA at 162 Russell Ave. in Rockport.

The exhibition includes work by 28 artists, chosen by jurors Jennifer Gross, chief curator of the deCordova Sculpture Park & Museum in Lincoln, Massachusetts, and Deborah Weisgall, arts and culture writer for The New York Times, The Atlantic, Esquire, and The New Yorker. Gross and Weisgall noted that the work in this Biennial includes a wide range of materials in a “surprising array of forms.” They said the exhibition “offers a sense of what artists working in Maine are thinking, feeling, and seeing: what has captured their attention — and ours.”

Leah Gauthier

“Some bring gifts, 2456708.562500″ by Leah Gauthier

More than 475 artists applied for the 2014 CMCA Biennial Exhibition. The artists whose work is included this year are Jeffrey Becton of Deer Isle; Emily Brown of South Montville; Stephanie Cardon of Cushing; Cole Caswell, Adriane Herman, John Knight, and Adam John Manley of Portland; Anne-Claude Cotty of Stonington; Cynthia Davis of Harpswell; Scott Davis of Rockland; Susan Dewsnap of Lewiston; Leah Gauthier and Bridget Spaeth of Brunswick; Lauren Gillette of York; Linda Mahoney of Waldoboro; Fred Michel of Westbrook; Munira Naqui of Falmouth; Sean Patrick O’Brien of Freeport; Jordie Oetken of Skowhegan; Jan Owen and Dennis Pinette of Belfast; Shannon Rankin of Rangeley; Meryl Ruth of Cumberland; Barbara Sullivan of Solon; Daphne Taylor of Montville; Sharon Townshend of Pownal; Jennifer Wilkey of Wiscasset; and Jeff Woodbury of South Portland.

Adam John Manley

“Small Craft #1″ by Adam John Manley

CMCA has held juried Biennial exhibitions since 1970. They are open to artists working in all media who have strong connections with Maine, and they include works that were created within the previous two years. The 2014 Biennial Exhibition will be on view through December 7. For information about artist talks and other events connected with the Biennial, visit cmcanow.org. The Center for Maine Contemporary Art is a nonprofit organization advancing contemporary art in Maine through exhibitions and educational programs. Exhibition galleries are open Tues. – Sat. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.and Sun. 1 to 5 p.m. Admission: $5; CMCA members free.

Austin Abbey’s Shakespeare at the Farnsworth

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On Saturday, October 4, to celebrate both the 450th anniversary of the birth of William Shakespeare and the 125th anniversary of the Rockland Shakespeare Society, the Farnsworth Art Museum will open a new exhibition entitled Edwin Austin Abbey’s Shakespeare. This exhibition will feature approximately thirty works of America’s foremost illustrator of Shakespeare’s plays from the collection of the Yale University Art Gallery, in New Haven, Connecticut. The exhibition will be on display in the museum’s Crosman Gallery through January 4, 2015.

Abbey at the Farnsworth

“Malvolio in the dungeon, Twelfth Night – Act III, Scene IV” by Edwin Austin Abbey

Drawn from the largest and most important collection of Abbey’s works, numbering more than 2,500, in the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, this exhibition will examine Abbey’s illustrations of many of the best-known scenes in Shakespeare’s plays such as the death of Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet and the murder of Duncan in Macbeth. William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright and actor, often regarded as the world’s pre-eminent dramatist. He has been credited with writing around 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, though debate about his authorship continues. His plays, translated into most major living languages, are performed more often than those of any other playwright.

Edwin Austin Abbey was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1852. He began his career as an illustrator for such magazines as Harper’s Weekly and Scribner’s Magazine. He moved to England in 1878 and was made a full member of the Royal Academy in 1898. In 1897, renowned for his work as an illustrator of Shakespeare’s works, Abbey was awarded an honorary M.A. degree by Yale University. In 1937 Abbey’s estate was donated to the Yale University Art Gallery. Founded in 1832, the Gallery is one of the oldest public art museums in the United States.

The exhibition will be celebrated at a free community opening, on Friday, October 3, from 5 – 8 p.m., as part of the First Fridays at the Farnsworth. The event will feature community participation in sonnet and script reading, a Shakespeare insult booth, roving minstrels, soft drinks and cookies as well as special store discounts for members. This exhibition is sponsored in part by Paul Cavalli & Jack McKenney and the Goose River Exchange. First Fridays at the Farnsworth is sponsored by The First, N.A.

Abbey at the Farnsworth

“Lady Macbeth: “Infirm of purpose! Give me the daggers…,”, Act II, Scene II, Macbeth” by Edwin Austin Abbey

Art House Picture Frames celebrates August with Joshua Ferry

Autumn is fast upon us! The wheel of the year keeps on turning. It’s difficult to believe that summer is rapidly coming to a close. But, there has definitely been a chill in the air and the leaves are turning rich hues of red, orange, and yellow. There is something about Maine during this time of year. The air is filled with the sharp scent of wood smoke and a hike through the woods is invigorating. Day and night are in balance and it is a perfect time to take stock of our lives and work at achieving a similar equilibrium.

Art House Picture Frames in Portland celebrates the shift in season and five years of business with an artist reception for Joshua Ferry on the October First Friday, October 3, from 5-8 p.m.

Art House Picture Frames on facebook

“August 4″ by Joshua Ferry

Joshua Ferry “August 6″ by Joshua Ferry

Art House Picture Frames is located at 61 Pleasant Street, in Portland. For more information call (207) 221-3443 or visit arthousepictureframes.com.

Salty Dog Gallery Presents “Adventures in India”

Salty Dog Gallery

The Salty Dog Gallery in Prospect Harbor will be displaying photographs by Dean Kotula for the duration of the season.

“Traveling in India is a thrill; it will enchant one moment and try your patience the next. India happens to you. You will learn to loosen up some of the controls you use to navigate life and come away with a fuller, deeper understanding and appreciation of not only yourself but other people and animals that share this planet. It will be unforgettable. At least this has been my experience and it is my privilege to share this adventure with you.”

The Salty Dog Gallery is a seasonal gallery located at 173 Main St. in Prospect Harbor. We deal exclusively in 20th century and contemporary fine art photography. For more information call (207) 963-7575 or visit saltydoggallery.net.

“Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection” On View at PMA

Portland Museum of Art

“Queen Elizabeth I” by Hans Eworth (English, born Belgian, circa 1520-1579)

This fall, the Portland Museum of Art (PMA) will showcase a rich survey of British art spanning six centuries in the exhibition Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection. Organized by the Denver Art Museum, the exhibition will feature 50 masterworks of British art by luminaries including Hans Holbein the Younger, Sir Anthony van Dyck, Thomas Gainsborough, Sir Thomas Lawrence, John Constable, Angelica Kauffman, and George Stubbs. The Berger Collection is one of the most impressive collections of British art in America and this exhibition provides audiences the rare opportunity to see such a significant body of paintings in this region. The PMA is the first venue in this traveling show, which will be on view in Portland October 2, 2014 through January 4, 2015.

With its diverse array of subjects and styles spanning six centuries of artistic practice, Treasures of British Art traces key developments in British art and culture through a chronological presentation of works. The earliest picture, a gilded altarpiece with a Crucifixion scene from circa 1395, is also an extremely rare surviving example of late Medieval religious painting—the type of object that was systematically destroyed in England when King Henry VIII broke away from the Roman Catholic Church. Portraiture has long been an important genre in British art, and this tradition is well-represented in the exhibition from the linear, decorative style of 16th-century portraits of Tudor royals and nobility, to the loosely brushed naturalism ushered in by Sir Anthony van Dyck and found in 17th- and 18th-century portraiture, to the expressionistic 21st-century image of the artist David Hockney by Adam Birtwistle. Marine paintings and landscapes of faraway places—including a monumental naval battle painting by Adriaen van Diest and a luminous harbor scene by John Constable—reflect not only shifting aesthetic approaches to the natural world, but also the importance of maritime life and overseas exchange in the history of the British Isles. History paintings, equestrian subjects, and other important genres of the British school in styles ranging from the traditional to modern round out the expansive breadth of the exhibition.

The Berger Collection is a major private collection largely of British art, with a small but significant group of works by artists of other schools, including the French artist François Boucher and the American Winslow Homer. The late William M. B. Berger and his wife Bernadette Johnson Berger began amassing this collection in the mid-1990s out of their dual passion for British culture and for art’s potential to educate. Now owned by the Berger Collection Educational Trust and placed on long-term loan at the Denver Art Museum, the collection continues to expand through new acquisitions. The British paintings, drawings, and art objects number approximately 200 works and span more than six centuries—from the 14th to the 21st century. The very best paintings from this extraordinary collection have been selected for the traveling exhibition to fulfill the Berger family’s mission of sharing these masterpieces with a wide public audience.

Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection is accompanied by a catalogue of the same title authored by Kathleen Stuart, Curator of the Berger Collection. This catalogue includes full-color plates and detailed entries on each of the works in the exhibition.

Marnie Sinclair “Making Sense of Climate Change Through Art”

Marnie Sinclair

“Nature has always inspired my art. I find her perfect balance, color combinations, textures, and designs especially intriguing, motivating me to try a wide variety of artistic expressions to speak to her grandeur.”

Marnie Sinclair’s traveling sculpture exhibit Making Sense of Climate Change Through Art attempts to ” incorporate Nature’s extreme beauty with a bit of tension from our careless abuse of our only home.” Marnie is looking for venues to display and discuss “balance, art and climate change,” followed by her movie,”Nature’s Spin Through Art,” which uses sculptu her sculptures to illustrate the story of climate change as told by three experts in the field, Bill McKibben, 350.org, George Woodwell, founder of Woods Hole Research Center, and Jerry Sullivan, retired Physicist from NOAA.

"Nature's Spin Through Art" on YouTube

“Nature’s Spin Through Art” on YouTube

Marnie Sinclair, from Damariscotta, ME, is a process artist who works in many different mediums. Sculpture is her preferred choice and she is currently working in copper trying to solve the many variables of kinetic sculpture. She recently moved from Martha’s Vineyard, MA where she was a videographer who created many videos about water issues on the island. She is an environmental activist who’s art work often reflects her concerns about climate change and how we are living in a non-sustainable way that impacts all life on the planet. Her three dimensional and two dimensional work has been shown extensively in the Boston area, as well as on the Vineyard.

Her bronze animal sculptures can also be seen at the Ducktrap Bay Trading Co. on Main st. in Camden, and she has recently joined the Pemaquid Group of Artists as a guest for the year, showing her oil paintings. That gallery is across from the Pemaquid lighthouse in Lighthouse Park, in Bristol, Maine. Marnie is also a member of The Bristol Road Galleries, a 4-gallery consortium of artists who are close neighbors.

Klein and Loznicka Exhibit at the Pemaquid Art Gallery

Visitors to Bristol’s Lighthouse Park can see more than spectacular scenery this season by venturing into the The Pemaquid Art Gallery to view a selection of inspired paintings including the work of Marlene Loznicka and Barbara Klein. This season a selection of the well-respected artists’ watercolor and oil paintings are being featured at the coastal gallery.

M. Loznicka Studio Gallery

“Monhegan Fish Houses” by Marlene Loznicka

Light and mood are Marlene Loznicka’s artistic signature but movement and vitality play a part in her work as well. Loznicka explains “light is what interests me, especially the Maine light and the light on Monhegan Island. I have been painting on the island for thirty years and never tire of it.”

A Maine native, Loznicka’s Studio Gallery is housed in an old one room schoolhouse on the picturesque Pemaquid Peninsula. The charming setting is the perfect jumping off point for her artistic adventures which often mean a trip to Monhegan Island. She happily recalls that while having a one person exhibit at the Island Inn that she had finally realized her goal of becoming a Monhegan artist.

Loznicka’s creative life began early and she enhanced her natural ability at the North Carolina State School of Design and studied at La Romita School of Art in Italy. Her painting style is also influenced by Andrew Wyeth and John Singer Sargent. She is a member of the New England Watercolor Society, Southern Watercolor Society and the Watercolor Society of North Carolina. Loznicka is the recipient of many major awards and her work is included in numerous prestigious collections including the Portland Museum of Art..

Barbara Klein at Pemaquid Art Gallery

“What a View” by Barbara Klein

“Fresh” is the key word for the paintings of Bristol artist Barbara Klein. With her oil paints and canvas Klein captures the essential best of the local scene. Her paintings portray the straightforward and unpretentious aspect of the Maine coast. Klein’s relaxed and joyful attitude is translated by her brushes into compositions in which cottages and barns are in harmony with the natural world.

When weather permits Klein prefers working on location immersed in the mid–coast Maine environment she loves. Recently a series of small works of light filled landscapes has been on her easel.

Barbara Klein shares how she “was driving along one afternoon and became struck with the simplicity and the beauty of a house sitting on a sun drenched hillside. I felt an urgency to respond to what I had seen and immediately started painting.“ Since that initial encounter with her muse, Klein has never been far from her brushes. Local artists John Whalley, Tom McCobb, and Barbara Applegate have influenced her as has painting with Alfred Chadbourn. Klein now eighteen years into her professional art career desires to keep her work simple in character in order to maintain the freshness she is known for.
This is Klein’s ninth year exhibiting and selling her popular oils at the Pemaquid Art Gallery. She comments, “I have met so many wonderful people through my art life including customers who have repeatedly purchased my work.” Klein’s work may also be viewed this season at the Vintage Wine Bar in Hallowell.

Visit the Pemaquid Art Gallery this season to see work by these two artists as well as those of exhibiting at the Pemaquid Art Gallery this season are Barbara Applegate, Debra Arter, Bruce Babb, Julie Babb, Stephen Busch, Trudi Curtis, William Curtis, Peggy Farrell, Helen Viola Glendinning, Claire Hancock, Kay Sawyer Hannah, Jean Nelson Harris, Jane Herbert, Hannah Ineson, Will Kefauver, Jan Kilburn, Patti Leavitt, Phyllis Harper Loney, Sally Loughridge, Nancy O’Brien MacKinnon, Maggie Macy, Judy Nixon, Paul Sherman, Marnie Sinclair, Pande Stevens, Ernest Thompson Jr., Robert Vaughan.

The Pemaquid Art Gallery is situated within Pemaquid Lighthouse Park at Pemaquid Point and on line at pemaquidartgallery.com. The gallery is open every day through Columbus Day from 10 until 5.

Jill Valliere and Terry Kelly at The Gallery at Somes Sound

Jill-VJill Valliere, Mystical Marsh, 27″ x 27″, mixed media with metal leafing

The Gallery at Somes Sound presents an Art & Furniture Exhibition featuring “Divergence: Paintings by Jill Valliere” and “No Finer Chair .. Anywhere – Furniture by Terry Kelly.” The show opens September 28 and runs through October 11 The Gallery at Somes Sound’s primary focus is to celebrate America’s long standing tradition in the art of fine furniture making, painting and sculpture. It continues to be the finest Furniture and Art Gallery along the Coast of Maine.

9 Maine Artists in the Howard Hill Exhibition

The Harlow Gallery in partnership with the Kennebec Land Trust (KLT), presents a very special benefit art exhibition October 12 – November 1, 2014 at Slates Restaurant located at 167 Water Street. in Hallowell in celebration of the KLT’s pending acquisition of the Howard Hill property in Augusta.

A public reception at Slates on Sunday, October 12 from 5 - 8 p.m. will coincide with the opening of a related exhibition celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Kennebec Land Trust across the street at the Harlow Gallery. Welcome comments from Deb Fahy, Executive Director of the Harlow Gallery and Brian Kent, KLT President are scheduled for 6:30pm at the Harlow Gallery. The reception is free and open to the public, refreshments will be served, cash bar.

KLT-Howard-Hill

 

Howard Hill consists of 164 wooded acres that serve as the scenic forested backdrop for Maine’s State Capitol. This ambitious project is part of KLT’s 25th Anniversary “Conservation Across Generations” campaign, and 50% of art sales from the show will benefit the Howard Hill project, with some artists donating 100% of sales to the project. An open call earlier this year invited Maine artists to create art depicting or inspired by the Howard Hill property environs, history and views from or including the hill. The work to be included in benefit exhibition was selected by a a group of jurors including Norm Rodrigue and Jane Davis from the Kennebec Land Trust, and Deb Fahy, Allison McKeen and Elena Kirillova from the Harlow Gallery. Artists whose work was selected for exhibition include:

Nancy Bixler of Hallowell
Angie Blevins of New Sharon
Ramona du Houx of Solon
Penny Markley of Winthrop
Nancy McGinnis of Hallowell
Robin Miller of Augusta
Johanna Moore of Farmingdale
Jane Page-Conway of Bowdoinham
Judith Schuppien of Pittson

Established in 1988, The Kennebec Land Trust works cooperatively with landowners and communities to conserve the forests, shorelands, fields, and wildlife that define central Maine. The Trust protects land permanently, offers opportunities for people to learn about and enjoy the natural world, and works with partners to support sustainable forestry and farming. KLT has partnered with landowners in 21 communities to protect more than 4,800 acres on 60 properties through land donations, fee purchases, and conservation easements. Volunteers have constructed 37 miles of trails on KLT land and developed informative brochures and maps of KLT properties that encourage visitors to learn about and enjoy Kennebec County’s natural landscape. Most properties are open to the public for walking, hiking, hunting, fishing, enjoying nature, and creating art! For more information, visit them online at tklt.org.

Wiscasset Art Walk highlights Watershed Center for Ceramic Arts

Wiscasset Art Walk on facebook

Curious about how to throw a clay pot – or even what that means? Visit the pop-up gallery at 106 Main Street during the Wiscasset Art Walk on Thursday, September 25, 5 – 8 p.m., where artists from the Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts will be demonstrating wheel and hand-building techniques with clay. Watershed will also have a pottery sale, featuring the work of current artists-in-residence, Watershed staff, and nationally renowned clay artists.

The Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts was established in 1986, at a former brick-making factory, with a dual mission: to provide artists time and space to explore ideas with clay and to promote education and awareness of the ceramic arts among the general public. Watershed is located in Newcastle on a 32 acre campus that includes a 16,000 sq. ft. studio “barn” space and a state of the art kiln facility.

During the summer and fall, small groups of artists live and work at Watershed in a close-knit community with room, board, and 24/7 studio access. Artists come to Watershed to follow their own path of inquiry while benefiting from the wisdom and inspiration of other artists in residence. Watershed artists also provide clay education and creative experiences to diverse populations throughout Maine. For clay artists, Watershed offers workshops throughout the year and use of the kilns and studio spaces. Through their “Mudmobile” program, teaching artists bring Maine clay, tools, and glazes to off-campus sites for workshops, including community centers, senior programs, and public and private schools. Watershed has served over 1,200 clay artists and more than 20,000 children and adults through community education programs.

During the Wiscasset Art Walk, Watershed will feature their fall residents in their temporary gallery at 106 Main St. These dedicated ceramic artists come from as far away as Georgia, Nevada, and Oregon to spend six weeks ‘exploring mud’ and creating a wide range of ceramics during their time at Watershed. In addition to demonstrations, completed pieces will be on display to Art Walk visitors, and artists will be on hand to talk about their work, their technique, and the Watershed residency program. Artists include Alex O’Neal, Charal Hatfield, Jackie Sedlock, Kristina Hamm, Meredith Morten, Molly Allen, and Sarah Southwick.

Enjoy the vibrancy of Wiscasset Village during the last Wiscasset Art Walk of 2014! Galleries, artists’ studios, and most shops will be open from 5 – 8 p.m. to welcome visitors. Major Sponsors are The First, Carleton Realty, Ames True Value, and Carriage House Gardens; sponsors include Big Barn Coffee, Carl Larrabee Insurance Agency, and Fogg Art Painting Restoration & Custom Framing. For more information about participating in Wiscasset Art Walk 2015 as an artist, performer, volunteer, or sponsor, please contact event coordinators Lucia Droby at ludroby@verizon.net or Ann Scanlan (207) 882-8290.

Ocean House Gallery & Frame Grand Opening!

OH-long-logo

Ocean House Gallery & Frame has been working feverishly to get the shop ready and now are excited to share the news that they are Officially Open For Business at 299 Ocean House Road Cape Elizabeth, ME 04107. Stop by anytime to say hello, or visit on facebook, and if you know anyone who needs framing done in the area, send them in their direction! Ocean House Gallery & Frame regular business hours will be: Wednesday – Saturday from 12 – 6 p.m. and by appointment.

Joyce Steel “Stillpoint” at Tidemark Gallery

Steel-Sea-Smoke-#2

“Sea Smoke #2″ by Joyce Eames Steel

Tidemark Gallery on Main Street in Waldoboro will host an Opening Reception on Saturday, September 6, for “Stillpoint”, a show of paintings by artist Joyce Eames Steel, which will be on view from September 3 – October 4.

Steel’s small scale works, in oil and in acrylic, range in style from realism to non-representational. Some are executed with attention to detail, while others move beyond the descriptive to focus on light and color to achieve the subtle essence of the moment. Whether a coastal scene or a non-objective piece, her paintings frequently capture the feeling of “still shots” — timeless, serene and contemplative.

Steel belongs to a family of artists in Maine. She began her formal art training at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and holds a degree in design from Hartford Art School, University of Hartford, CT. She also studied painting and design at Studio Arts Center International in Florence, Italy. Her varied career has included teaching art both in private and public schools, graphic design and marketing, work in the non-profit sector and in social services – most recently for Healthy Lincoln County. She currently paints from her studio in Waldoboro and plans to teach classes at River Arts in Damariscotta in the upcoming year.

This September 6 event will be another in a series of multiple-gallery openings including Maine Coast Artist Gallery in Friendship, Philippe Guillerm Gallery and Old Number Nine in Waldoboro.

Tidemark Gallery hours are 10 to 5, Wednesday through Saturday. For more information, please contact Tidemark Gallery, 902 Main Street, Waldoboro, 832-5109, or visit tidemarkgallery.com

Music and Poetry Saturday and Sunday in Waldoboro Village

Friendship-Street-Waldoboro

On Saturday, 27 September, 6:30 p.m., there will be a folk, blues, jazz jam at
Old Number Nine, Friendship Street, next to the drug store in downtown
Waldoboro. Everyone is welcome to bring their acoustic instruments, snacks,
beverages and talent.

On Sunday, 28 September, 2:30 p.m., Old Number Nine will also host an open
reading of poetry and/or prose, followed by a potluck supper of finger foods and
salads. Stephen Randall Parmley will read from his collected poems, “Gaia
Sutra.”

Contributions will help support the Medomak Arts Project — MAP — A Public
Benefit Corporation, in its aim to foster the creative arts in the Medomak
region. For more information, please call 790-0527.

Maine Discovery Museum announces Gala Art Auction

Maine Discovery Museum

Maine Discovery Museum’s 2014 Gala Art Auction – “A Case for Art” will be held on Saturday, November 15.  The twelfth annual gala dinner-auction features 70 fabulous one-of-a-kind artworks in various media. This year’s central piece is a glass-door cabinet, which can be free-standing or wall-mounted. Sixty-five of these cabinets have been uniquely decorated by Maine artists, who donated their time and talent to the works and to MDM. These pieces are joined by a variety of jewelry made by local jewelers, a special raffle and several framed paintings. The event starts at 5 p.m. with a preview/cash bar/silent auction, followed by dinner at 6:30 p.m. and a live auction at 8 p.m. Reservation and absentee bidding information available by phone or online. Visit our website to see the wonderful artworks up for auction! All the money raised from this event will support the museum’s mission to provide a fun, hands-on place where art, science and nature come alive for Maine children and their families. Through this most important event in the museum’s fundraising year, admission and programs are kept affordable and accessible to children and families of all abilities and backgrounds. Time: 5 – 9:30 p.m. Cost: $50.00/person Location: Hilton Garden Inn, 250 Haskell Road, Bangor Contact person: Niles Parker, Executive Director – nparker@mainediscoverymuseum.org.

Husson University exhibits Patricia Pasteur

Pasteur-at-Husson

Husson University announced today that it is featuring the work of mixed media artist Patricia Pasteur in the Robert E. White Gallery in Peabody Hall on its Bangor, Maine campus. The exhibit, entitled “Cold Stream Reflections (Altered Imagery)” will run until October 30, 2014.

“My work is a blend of photography, digital art, and painting on canvas,” said Pasteur. “I find inspiration in the colors, lights, textures I see outside my window in the beautiful Maine woods on Cold Stream Pond in Lowell, Maine.” Pasteur’s work is the result of a great deal of experimentation and happy accidents. Using a blank canvas painted with bright, vivid colors in acrylic, it is then treated with a digital ground which enables the colors to fully absorb the dye-based ink from the printer making it waterproof and permanent. Several photographs are then blended together and printed on the archival canvas. In reflecting on her work process, Pasteur said, “I never know what the final outcome will be. I love taking an ordinary photograph and making it extraordinary.”

The Robert E. White Gallery is free and open to the public, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is located in Peabody Hall on the campus of Husson University at 1 College Circle, Bangor, ME. For additional information contact (207) 941-7887.

The Stable Gallery announces “hARvesT 13″

The Stable Gallery

The Stable Gallery announces a new show  “hARvesT 13″ featuring
paintings by Daisy Greene, R.C. McFaul, Priscilla McCandless and mixed
media works by Stephen M. Mott. Textiles and hooked wool by Susie
Stephenson and works by weaver Bill Bellows will be displayed along with
ceramics by Liz Proffetty. Textiles by Janet Percival and wooden utensils
by David Pollack will also be featured.

The show’s opening reception is Friday September 19th from 5-7 p.m. and
the work will on display through October 18. Dave Mello and Kevin James will provide music and refreshments will be served.

The Gallery is open every day from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at 26 Water St. Damariscotta,
Maine. For more information visit stablegallerymaine.com or call (207) 563-1991.

Awards, Publication for Bayview Artists!

Bayview Gallery is proud to announce that Mariella Bisson has won a major two-year Fellowship in Painting from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation. Established in 1985 by Lee Krasner, wife of Jackson Pollock and a significant painter in her own right, “for the purpose of providing financial assistance to artists of established ability.” A hearty congratulations to Mariella and we look forward to bringing you the fruits of her labors as we receive them!

Mariella Bisson at Bayview Gallery

“Fawn’s Leap, Pale Moon” by Mariella Bisson

Wendy Newcomb creates luminous and brightly colored paintings of the lakes, harbors and mountains of Maine. The first of two covers she has done for L.L. Bean are in your mailboxes right now!

Janet Laird-Lagassee (one of our most awarded painters) has announced that her miniature watercolor painting “Matchless” has been awarded the Best of Watercolor Award at the Artistic Designs Gallery Juried Miniature Show in Brownsburg, Indiana and “Pumpkins No. 60″ was awarded Best of Show at the Heartland Art Guild International Miniatures Art Show at the Miami County Historical Society Museum in Paola, Kansas! In addition, “Wood Pile” earned the Fine Art Miniature Distinction Award at the Roswell Fine Arts League/New Mexico Miniature Arts Society International Juried Show at the Roswell Museum and Arts Center in New Mexico.

Janet Laird-Lagassee at Bayview Gallery

“Matchless” by Janet Laird-Lagassee

 

 

DIAA surprises with “Pin It Up II”

Jacqueline Davidson on DIAA facebook

“On Sand Beach” by Jacqueline Davidson

If you think “PIN IT UP II,” the Deer Isle Artists’ Association show that opens September 19 and runs through October 5, is only about “things that have been sewn,” you will be in for a surprise! As usual, the gallery offers viewers an opportunity to see how local artists, using a wide range of mediums, interpret a theme and create a vast array of unusual work. This time, the theme relates to the fact that all work will be pinned up… no frames attached!

For example, two very different interpretations of beading can be seen in the creations of Cathy Hart and Pat Taniashvili. Pat designs distinctive, one-of-a-kind beaded purses that are hand fashioned using very thin knitting needles that are about the size of hatpins. She lines her hand sewn purses with silk or velvet and finishes them with a metal frame. Cathy weaves and sews various colors and textures of glass beads together to create pins, bracelets, earrings and necklaces using different stitches and techniques. Some of the necklace and bracelet clasps include a hand made glass lamp worked bead.

Robert Starkey will be showing some of his ink drawings that explore the varied patterns and textures revealed within the landscape. Similarly, nature is an inspiration for Jacqueline Davidson, as she utilizes watercolors to paint the details she sees in elements such as rocks, shells, and feathers. Ellsworth resident Judith Felch, who often completes her work in an abandoned quarry or on the Stonington shore, will be exhibiting small watercolors and pencil sketches done both in graphite and in colored pencil.

Judith Felch

“Shore Study” by Judith Felch

Michael DeMatteo, whose paintings are in ink and watercolors, describes his work as being in the Japanese Sumi-e style. The subjects are of still-life and landscape, inspired by the artist Giorgio Morandi, and by his trip to Italy two years ago. Using a variety of styles and media, Anya Antonovych Metcalf notes that the hallmark of her work is color. She deals with a cluster of concerns: memory, place, narrative, duality, found abstraction, landscape, and the relationship between image and object. David Kofton comments, “So much eludes the mind [and as an artist] I try to keep that from happening.” Similarly, glass artist Sam Jones explains that she utilizes her work to demonstrate “the interaction between the rational and the ecstatic.”

Other artists participating in the show include Naishun Chang, Linda Deming, Mary Eaton, Deborah Lothrop, Heather Lyon, Mary Bracy Martin, Corey Paradise, Carolyn Raedle, Elizabeth Sawyer, Don Seymour, Sherry Streeter, Cynthia Stroud-Watson, and Hub White.
The public is warmly invited to attend the show’s opening reception and to meet the artists on Friday, September 19 from 5:00-7:00 PM, at the DIAA Gallery, 15 Main Street, in Deer Isle Village. The DIAA Gallery will be open Wednesdays through Sundays from 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM. For more information, please call (207) 348-2330.

Jeff Bye “Outside In” at Greenhut Galleries

Jeff Bye at Greenhut Galleries

“Yellow” by Jeff Bye

Outside In is Jeff Bye’s third solo exhibition at Greenhut Galleries and continues his ongoing exploration of abandoned, neglected buildings throughout the Northeast. Through work as a conservator and set designer, Bye was allowed access to buildings and spaces that are off limits to the general public. He became fascinated with the monumentality of these abandoned structures that were once vibrant with activity as well as the mystery and intrigue of what’s inside.

Bye states “These paintings have a strong impact on the viewer……the composition and how the light penetrates through the space and the use of contrast from very dark and ominous corners to pockets of light revealing the beauty of decay. This is also relative in the narrative images that I have created. There’s a drama that is present by how the figures occupy the space. This is not always intentional. The figure naturally takes the attention of the viewer and creates an overall drama and mood.” Viewing these paintings is like entering a dark room on a bright sunny day. Your eyes need time to adjust to fully appreciate the raw patinas, composition and textures.

Jeff Bye holds a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). Through RISD’s European Honors program, he spent a year in Rome, Italy studying classical art and architecture. He received his MFA at the New York Academy of Figurative Art. His formal education exposed him further to the work of artists like Henri Matisse, Pierre Bonnard and Lucian Freud, whose styles influence his work to this day. Bye has been awarded the distinction of Master Painter from the Copley Society of Art, Boston, MA, a professional credential organization. At the time, he was the youngest master painter in the history of the organization.

“US and THEM” and “Essentia” at Carver Hill Gallery

Carver Hill Gallery, 338 Main Street in Rockland, Maine, is pleased to present a wildly interesting new group show, US and THEM, where the artists explore others and their relationship to others. The show opens First Friday, October 3, from 5 – 8 p.m. Many of the artists will be present. Some of the pieces included in this exhibition will feature more literal interpretations. In others, the artist might take more artistic liberty and use the subject to launch a creative idea, or narrate a story. Artist Jennifer Knaus explains, “Although the results of my paintings may seem surreal, I am more inspired by the Surrealists techniques of tapping into the subconscious rather than by actual Surrealist painting. I have a desire to personalize idealized notions of beauty and importance; to embellish icons with humor and a little absurdity, but also within those details to suggest a narrative that is mysterious and atmospheric.”

These paintings combine pain, frustration, reverence, fantasy, worship, and humor to create a moving rendition of the individual artist’s response to the presence and acts of others. Some of the stories are more obvious than others, leaving us to add yet another interpretation to the mix.

Shari Weschler Rubeck shares, “My muses are life’s experiences, human psyche, curiosities of animal nature, elements of theatre, dance, backstage goings-on and fantasy mixed with a bit of humor for good measure. My imagery is generally figurative in nature with occasional outbursts of abstract or street art explorations.” Her paintings explore and include the strength of women during the age of Tudor and how they related to modern day women and motherhood, The Ego, the future of people and connectivity in a technological world, and her recent diagnosis with MS.

Ted Keller will show a compelling dead artist series in watercolor, and David Estey will show wonderful abstracted portraits in acrylic on yupo.

Andy Finkle will present a quirky new portrait of President Eisenhower in a rumored 1957 meeting with aliens. Finkle will also show a “surprise” interactive work. Finkle says, “I enjoy painting portraits of men, beasts, and beings and have a growing sub-specialty in second-tier celebrity works. My work now can be seen in the world’s only cryptozoology museum in Portland, and it must be noted that my paintings have been displayed in the only bowling alley in Antarctica. My paintings were briefly featured on a television show that was (unjustly) cancelled.”

Featured artists include Shari Weschler Rubeck, David Estey, Ted Keller, Ken Foster, Jennifer Knaus, Katie Wilson, Steven Morrison, America Martin, Kate Fitzgerald, Andy Finkle and Gigi Gatti.

Carver Hill Gallery

“Moon Lace” by Christina DeHoff

The upstairs gallery at Carver Hill presents “Essentia” (essentĭa , ae, f. sum, \I.the being or essence of a thing; transl. of the Gr. οὐσία) a complementary showing of figures and new, long awaited landscapes by Maine native Christina DeHoff, who now resides in Hawaii. A clear and recognizable theme runs through both her figurative visionary paintings and her landscape paintings. Christina believes that one can feel the presence of grace and love in her depiction of heart expanding oceans, sensual rolling hills and dream filled skies. Though her landscapes are void of figures, the same sensitivity is there – the spirit of the landscape is as palpable as the spirit of the people she paints. Christina graduated from the University of Maine in 1995 with a BS in Art Education, and later owned and operated the Gallery at 357 Main in Rockland, Maine. For 10 years she showed the work of more than 50 artists, including her own, which typically proved to sell out in her solo shows.

The gallery will also feature the work of glass artist David Jacobson. David employs contemporary colors with classical forms to create unique expressions in this fluid medium. David was born and raised in New York, and graduated from the University of Minnesota, where he first studied glassblowing. He has since studied with many notable glass artists from around the globe. David’s work ranges from functional pieces, like bowls and platters (gorgeous enough in form to be sculpture with the bonus of a purpose) to work he calls “Conversation Pieces” – glass word balloons with simple greetings or humorous observations on them.

Shows run through November 4.

Kindling Fund – Grants for Artists Informational Meeting at Waterfall Arts

The Kindling Fund

Nat May, Director of SPACE Gallery will present information about The Kindling Fund on Tuesday, September 30th at 6:30 PM at Waterfall Arts. He will present a brief overview of the artist grant program and take questions about the guidelines and application process.

SPACE Gallery in Portland created The Kindling Fund to support the energy of Maine’s visual arts community by funding innovative, artist-organized projects that engage the public in ways that are both inventive and meaningful. The Kindling Fund values risk and experimentation, unconventional engagement, and critical dialogue, and encourages collaborative efforts to reach new audiences, increase public interaction, and create new models for presenting artists’ work.

The Fund seeks to support a variety of publicly accessible projects, with a strong interest in alternative space/practices and site-specific presentations that don’t fit in established institutions or venues. Projects supported by The Kindling Fund may include (but are not limited to): public art projects, intervention or site specific installations, one-time events or performances, the publication of writing directly related to the visual arts including printed matter and online publications, online projects, artist residencies, series of screenings, curatorial projects that focus on unconventional artistic practice, lecture or workshop series, multimedia, video and photo projects, or unconventional exhibitions.

Waterfall Arts is located at 256 High Street in Belfast; for more information visit waterfallarts.org or call 338-2222. For further information about The Kindling Fund, visit kindlingfund.org.