The Dilemma of Memory: Maine Artists and the Holocaust

Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine

The Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine, located on the campus of the University of Maine at Augusta, presents an exhibit of sculpture, photography, prints, paintings, and poetry exploring themes and aspects of the Holocaust. The exhibit, featuring Maine artists and writers, runs from October 3 through December 3. An opening reception on October 17, 4-7 p.m., will feature the exhibit’s poets reading from their works and Maria Wagner playing “Soliloquy for Solo Clarinet” by Elliot Schwartz.

Exhibit organizer, artist Leonard Meiselman, has been planning and working on this exhibition for over a year. “I am continually amazed and fascinated by the ongoing outpouring of memoirs, documentaries, paintings, and poems – and now an opera and a new major film – 69 years after the Holocaust ended. Artists, writers, and filmmakers are still finding some essential energy in Holocaust themes,” he says. “Why does the Holocaust draw this amount of obsessive attention?”

Meiselman, a life-long artist, thought he had left New York City three years ago to live in Wiscasset and paint the trees in Maine, but found himself painting Holocaust images instead. “In this world of suffering and political turmoil in which we find ourselves today, it is meaningful to dwell on this chapter of the last century – to remember what happened and how it happened by gradual degrees and incremental infringements on human rights. I suspect that for my generation of artists and poets, it is about coming to terms with our history, our heritage, and our identity.”

As an organizer of The Dilemma of Memory, along with David Greenham, Program Director, Holocaust and Human Rights Center, and poet Lee Sharkey, Meiselman said he was deeply gratified with how the artists and poets came together to create this exhibition. This is a group of mature artists, he explained, grappling with similar ghosts and shadows: “I’ve experienced a wonderful sense of fellow-feeling, of finding other artists struggling with some of the same issues that haunt my work as an artist.” Meiselman asserts that the artists taking part in The Dilemma of Memory intend to make a statement: “It is both beautiful and terrible to live with the presence of a history of human suffering and to feel, somehow, that one can redeem the victims from anonymity.”

Participants in the exhibit include photographer Judy Glickman; sculptor Robert Katz; painters George Mason, Leonard Meiselman, and Bob Moskowitz; printmaker Dorothy Schwartz; and poets Tony Brinkley, Mark Melnicove, Lee Sharkey, Martin Steringesser, and Anna Wrobel.

The Dilemma of Memory: Maine Artists and the Holocaust is supported by Bath Savings Trust, UMA Senior College, Dr. Julius Ciembroniewicz, and J.S. McCarthy Printers. For directions and more information about the exhibit, visit hhrcmaine.org.

A Gala Evening Celebrating Survival and Choice

Pink Runway Project

The Pink Runway Project charity event will be held on October 18, 2014 at the Cross Insurance Center in Bangor. This inaugural event will feature a New York fashion week style show with original pieces created by Maine fashion designers, including Michael Shyka, modeled by breast cancer survivors that have undergone breast reconstruction. This formal gala will also feature live music and performances, a silent auction, open bar, and hors d’oeuvres from local chefs. Above all, the night will illuminate touching and inspiring tales of breast cancer survival and regrowth.

The Pink Runway Project is a new and exciting approach to provide awareness about breast reconstruction options in order to empower women to make informed choices. Proceeds from this informative and glamorous event will be donated to the Maine Breast Cancer Coalition and the BRA organization. Breast Reconstruction Awareness Day, or BRA Day, occurs annually in October and is an initiative designed to promote education, awareness and access regarding breast cancer reconstruction. The third annual BRA Day will take place on October 15, 2014. BRA Day USA is a collaborative effort between the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, The Plastic Surgery Foundation, plastic surgeons, breast centers, nurse navigators, corporate sponsors and breast cancer support groups.

Maine Breast Cancer Coalition’s Support Service Fund provides financial assistance for breast health or breast cancer related needs to qualified Maine residents. The Fund assists low-income, uninsured and underinsured people, including those newly diagnosed with breast cancer, whose particular needs are not covered by other assistance programs. Since the fund was established in 2000, MBCC has awarded grants totaling nearly $1,400,000 to more than 2,900 Maine residents.

The Pink Runway Project is Maine’s first and only charity event to bring awareness to the breast reconstruction options available to women diagnosed with breast cancer. Many women, who are bravely battling breast cancer and are facing life-saving surgery, must also grapple with the reality of losing their female identity. And, unfortunately, research reveals that 70 percent of women diagnosed with breast cancer are not being informed of their breast reconstruction options. The goal of the Pink Runway Project is to ensure that all breast cancer patients are fully informed of and given access to all of their reconstructive options.

This event coincides with Breast Cancer Awareness Day (BRA) and will feature a keynote presentation by Barbara Musser, a leading voice on reclaiming female self image after breast cancer. Barbara is the founder and CEO of Sexy After Cancer and is the author of Sexy After Cancer: Meeting Your Inner Aphrodite on the Breast Cancer Journey. A 25-year breast cancer survivor, speaker and educator, she teaches classes and holds retreats for women and couples about cancer, love and intimacy.

PR-MichaelShyka

Tickets will go on sale September 1, 2014. For more information please visit the PinkRunwayProject.com.

If you’d like more information on this topic, or to schedule an interview with Dr. Heidi Harrington, please call Sharon Anderson at (207) 947-1894 or email Sharon at sharon@bangorplastic.com.

Diane Green Hebert in the IEA Members Show in NYC

Mars Hall Gallery

“Poetry Bleeds Rust” Diane Green Hebert has been selected to exhibit her encaustic mask, “Tarquin the Proud”, in the IEA Members Show in NYC. The mixed media piece combines her expertise in handmade kozo paper, ceramic masks and encaustic. The show is sponsored by the International Encaustic Artists and was juried by Jean Dierdorf. “Tarquin the Proud” “Poetry Bleeds Rust” Oct. 1st thru Oct. 29th, 2014 Reception Oct. 2nd, 5-7 p.m. National Association of Women Artists Gallery 80 Fifth Ave., Suite 1405 NY, NY Curated by IEA Exhibitions Director Lola Battzell.

Craft in America Advance Film Screening: “Service”

Maine Crafts Association

Join the Maine Crafts Association at Engine in Biddeford, Maine for a free night of film, October 9th, 6pm, doors at 5:45! Seating is limited, first come first serve, or RSVP to secure a seat: email sbliss@mainecrafts.org.

Craft in America, the Peabody Award-wining series, continues to explore America’s creative spirit through the language and traditions of the handmade. The newest episode, “Service”, part of the PBS veterans initiative Stories of Service, is the story of craft and the military and premieres on PBS in November, but the MCA has obtained an advance copy and wants to share it with YOU! From the origins of the Army Arts & Crafts Program and the G.I Bill to contemporary soldiers and veterans, “Service” documents the power of the handmade to inspire, motivate and heal.

Maine Craft Weekend opens October 11

Maine Craft Weekend

Maine Craft Weekend (MCW), a statewide tour of Maine craft studios, breweries, businesses and events, is an opportunity for the public to explore the life and work of craft artists and craft brewers in Maine. MCW is a public, educational, community oriented, family friendly weekend October 11 + 12, 2014.

Modeled after Maine Maple Sunday and Buy Local Saturday, this self-guided tour features participants all over the state who are not regularly open to the public or who have planned special MCW events and demonstrations at their locations. Plan a route to include a pottery wheel lesson and a glass blowing demonstration in the morning, swing by a brew pub for lunch, wrap up the day perusing a craft show and start all over again on Sunday!

For more information or questions please email Marie Sugden at marie@mainecrafts.org or call (207) 588-0021.

Museums of Old York presents “Unraveled”

"Unraveled" at Museums of Old York

The Museums of Old York is presenting “Unraveled – Contemporary New England Fiber Art,” September 20 – December 6. The exhibition brings together the work of 18 regional artists who investigate and experiment with various forms of fiber in their artistic practice. While often paying homage to textile traditions, these contemporary fiber artists take advantage of a wide range of materials and techniques to create works that present their ideas, provoke commentary and pique visual enjoyment.

There have been a number of other museum exhibitions featuring contemporary fiber art, most recently at the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, MA, the American Textile Museum in Lowell, MA, and the Boston Institute of Contemporary Art. York’s “Unraveled” further pushes the limits of pre-conceived notions of materials, context and scale.

Cobey-Ziek-Unraveled

Adjacent to the exhibition’s introductory label is a three-panel, woven tapestry titled “Rain” by Vermont artist Bhakti Ziek. The artist is an expert in digital jacquard weaving and this radiant textile incorporates silk, cotton, rayon, and metallic yarns. To the left is a suspended shawl titled “Portrait of Alzheimer,” by Maine artist Katharine Cobey. The hand spun silk and wool threads begin in an orderly pattern from the lower-left, continue over the shoulder, and as it descends down to the right, the patterns degrade into a web of threads that spread out in disarray along the floor. Cobey is nationally recognized for her fiber sculpture and teaching.

Although these first two examples incorporate recognizable fiber materials, there is a serious shift as one proceeds into the gallery. Warren Seelig’s “Stone Carpet/Shadowfield” is a ten foot wide “weaving” constructed of stainless steel and red rock shards which cast dancing shadows on the wall. Seelig (Rockland, ME) is an artist with an international reputation, with his work included in over 30 major museum exhibitions in the United States, Europe, Japan and Korea.

Seelig-Stone-Carpet-Shadowfield

“Stone Carpet/Shadowfield” by Warren Selig

Within view of Seelig’s piece is “Wallpapered Space” by Samantha Fields. (Brockton, MA) The artist has adapted the piece to fit an 8 by 11 foot section of wall. It is made up of recycled crocheted afgans, framing and embroidered vinyl siding. Her patterns are hole-punched into the vinyl siding and then embellished with bright colored acrylic yarns. Although the materials are “plastic” and “perhaps a bit tacky” the end result has a certain charm and whimsy and questions our idea of beauty.

Unraveled-Gallery-View

The exhibition includes four “dresses” by Vermont artist Wylie Sophia Garcia which are a part of her project “The Dress That Makes the Woman – One Year. Twelve Dresses. One artist’s challenge to create and to wear a work of art for each month of the year.” Garcia intended to embark upon a ritualized creative challenge: to wear and to work daily on a dress for one month at a time for an entire year. The final sculptural “dresses” were her performance piece and personal diary as she went about her daily life in Burlington, Vermont.

Garcia-The-Dress-That-Makes-the-Woman

New Bedford artist Elin Noble exhibits a bold, red and black itajime shibori quilt. The artist has spent more than 30 years investigating traditional and contemporary dye techniques, focusing on Japanese itajime shibori (clamp-dye resist).

Vermont artist Michele Ratté uses drawing, printmaking, collage, and innovative textile printing processes to make her work. Her series of “Island” pieces and her most recent work, “Maze” use 22kt gold and palladium mono-prints on hand-loomed silk, linen, velum and fishing line. The pieces are elegantly displayed in acrylic cases lit from below.

A wide variety of materials, process and techniques are represented in the exhibition which is indicative of many of today’s fiber artists. During meetings with several diverse groups of participants Jodi Colella (Somerville, MA) created “Hive” which is made up of aluminum screen chambers stitched together with steel wire. In this installation the piece crawls up the gallery wall, casting deep shadows and creating negative spaces.

Merill Comeau (Concord, MA) uses painted vintage linens, composted fabric samples and deconstructed clothing for her wall installations. Melita Westerlund (Bar Harbor, ME) uses shredded blue jean fibers in her sculptural “Environmental Chaos,” Sallie Findlay (Deer Isle, ME) uses repurposed cotton scallop bags collected from local fisherman, and Allison Cooke Brown (Portland, ME) incorporates Q Reader codes into her work. Also on exhibit are works by Elizabeth Billings (Tunbridge, Vermont), Lisa Grey (Portsmouth, NH), Sarah Haskell (York, ME), Priscilla Nicholson (Brunswick, ME), Adrienne Sloane (Lexington, MA), and Katharine Whild (North Yarmouth, ME.)

There are several programs scheduled in conjunction with the exhibition.
Artist Merill Comeau will give a talk on Sunday October 5, 3 p.m. “Fiber Art Now: An Artist’s Perspective. Katharine Cobey will present a day long, knitting workshop, “Culling the Greats” on Saturday, October 25. Exhibition curator Mary Harding will give a gallery talk “My Fiber Road Trips” on Sunday, November 2, 3 pm. Historian Lynne Zacek Bassett will present “HerStory in Civil War Quilts” on Wednesday, November 5, 6 p.m. For further information on these programs please refer to the Museum’s web site www.oldyork.org.

Gallery hours are Thursday – Saturday 10-4, Sunday 1-4 through December 6th.
3 Lindsay Road, York, Maine. 207-363-4974

PMA Announces Strategic Vision and Positioning for the Future

PMA-building-Becker

Charles Shipman Payson Building, Portland Museum of Art, Maine. Photo by Craig Becker.

The Portland Museum of Art (PMA) announced today a strategic vision for its future that includes a multifaceted collection project titled PMA 2016: Your Museum, Reimagined; a campus master plan; and an organizational restructuring that will position and prepare the PMA for additional growth.

“Museums continue to be under great pressure to be mission driven and economically sustainable, two qualities that can be difficult to reconcile but are highly valued at the Portland Museum of Art,” said PMA Director Mark H.C. Bessire. “Today, it is this juncture of mission and economic efficiency where many museums seem to be challenged. Our goal is to make our mission and artistic vision sustainable through the optimization of resources, excellent planning, and a strong work and volunteer force committed to excellence and integrity.”

PMA 2016: Your Museum, Reimagined is the culmination of the PMA’s 2010-2015 Strategic Plan and involves evaluating and reinstalling our permanent collection of more than 18,000 objects, providing visitors and members a range of opportunities to access and interact with the collection. The museum will close for six weeks beginning in January 2016 and reopen to the public on Sunday, February 14, with a completely reinstalled and reinterpreted experience, online access to the art, and an enhanced campus.

PMA 2016 includes the publication of the museum’s first-ever collection catalogue, which will provide information, context, and insight into the museum’s history, architecture, and art. Written by PMA curators, the catalogue will feature the museum’s most significant works of art and will include an essay surveying the PMA’s 130-year history by Maine State Historian Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr.

PMA 2016 will also include digital access to the museum’s entire collection. With the collection available online, the PMA will ensure that the public and scholars alike can experience the art, regardless of their location. The online database project will provide unparalleled access to the PMA’s unique collection.

In addition to new ways to experience art in the galleries and online, PMA 2016 will introduce a campus master plan which will guide the museum’s physical presence for years to come, while enhancing its amenities and providing a better visitor experience—enabling individually tailored experiences with the art.

An anonymous New England foundation has partially funded the planning phases of this project with a $250,000 grant, which includes support for a new strategic plan, the campus master plan, and an audience assessment project. To leverage support for PMA collection access—specifically the establishment of an art study room and online collection database—the foundation has challenged the PMA to raise $300,000 by January 31, 2015, after which the museum will receive an additional $150,000 from the foundation.

As the museum implements PMA 2016, members of the curatorial staff have taken on new roles. Jessica May’s new title is Chief Curator, and she will provide leadership and the implementation of strategies for exhibition programming and for the care, development, and use of the PMA’s collection. Karen Sherry’s new title is Curator of American Art and Director of Collections and Andrew Eschelbacher is the new Susan Donnell and Harry W. Konkel Assistant Curator of European Art. Diana Greenwold has been hired as a Curatorial Fellow, and her work will focus on the PMA 2016 project.

The PMA now has a divisional structure that encompasses four areas: Exhibitions and Collections, Audience Engagement and Communications, Development and Membership, and Operations. The PMA has identified these divisions as the core areas that deliver the institutional mission while providing a strong system of communications, accountability, and shared decision-making. The Exhibitions and Collections division is co-directed by Chief Curator Jessica May and Registrar Lauren Silverson; Audience Engagement and Communications division is led by Elizabeth Jones; Development and Membership by Elizabeth Cartland; and Operations by Deputy Director Elena Murdock.

PMA 2016: Your Museum, Reimagined will help the PMA evolve alongside technological advancements, keep pace with a growing Portland, and promote the region’s cultural heritage well into the future.

Final Friday Art Walk in Brunswick for 2014

Calling all art enthusiasts to come to Brunswick Friday evening, October 10, 5-8PM, to support your local artists and enjoy the fruits of their work!

This coming Friday will be the final art walk sponsored by Five Rivers Arts Alliance for the 2014 season. Highlights of this Friday’s events include the return of the One Wheelers performing around Maine & Pleasant streets. In addition, Harpswell artist Hati Modr will display her beautiful oil paintings, mostly landscapes, at the Morrell Room of Curtis Library where Bob Modr, her husband will be performing with the Pistons!

Five River Arts Alliancefeaturing “Quiet Harbor” by Hati Modr

Also on Pleasant Street, St. Paul’s church will be hosting all the “pop up” artists; displays. In one locale, you can see, enjoy and purchase glass sushi dishes, copper jewelry, photographs, and paintings, to name a few of the offerings.

Worried about how to get around to all the locations? A free bus service makes the loop around the artists’ locations, from Fort Andross, up Maine Streets to Bowdoin and back around to Pleasant Street, every fifteen minutes throughout the evening.

So if you are looking for a fun and stimulating time, from 5 – 8 p.m., come support your local artists, musicians and visual artists from Freeport to Bath and points in between, who have gathered in Brunswick to share their talents with you!

For more information about the art walks, visit 5raa.org or call (207) 798-6964.

David Estey publishes “Whoop and Drive ’er” memoir

Estey-Whoop-and-Drive'er

David Estey has published a unique, illustrated memoir - an affectionate, humorous memoir of colorful family, friends and situations while growing up in Fort Fairfield, Presque Isle, and Belfast. It is called “Whoop and Drive ’er” – Growing up in Aroostook County, Maine.

You may have heard me tell some of the stories over the years. Friends have urged me to write them down. They begin with memorable subjects from Aroostook County: my family, in-laws, friends, classmates, and many other small-town characters and situations, while growing up in the 1940s and ‘50s.
 
It’s not just about Aroostook. I go on to include funny or unique characters and experiences after moving to Belfast, incidents in high school, raking blueberries, making art, funny expressions, and so forth. Then I describe going to RISD, studying art in Italy for a year, spending two years in the army, doing public affairs for IRS, dealing with the news media, living in the South, moving back to Maine, and navigating the art world. The book is endorsed on the back cover by Carl Little, distinguished poet and author of several books on Maine painting, and Kathryn Olmstead, editor of Echoes magazine and a columnist for Bangor Daily NewsCarl wrote, in part, “In this entertaining and often moving memoir … vintage photographs and Estey’s portraits and paintings are the perfect accompaniment to a storyline that will leave you laughing and inspire a tear or two.” Kathryn wrote, in part, “David’s memoir is laced with humor and filled with anecdotes that make it a tribute to small-town America.”
 
I’ve designed the 144-page memoir as an attractive art book, seven by ten inches, with 41 related photos or drawings and paintings I did over the years, some you may have seen and some not. I think it would make a wonderful keepsake or Christmas gift for family, friends and classmates; others who know me or the characters and situations I’ve described, and perhaps even total strangers.
 
Despite production and promotion costs, I’ve kept the price at a bargain $19.95 and I may never break even. It has been a labor of love, so I mainly want to get it into people’s hands and have them enjoy it. By mid-October, it will be available at Left Bank Books and other local stores, at maineauthorspublishing.com and amazon.com (where you can look inside), or a copy signed to you directly from me now. Simply send a check to me at 16 Pierce Street, Belfast, ME 04915. I’ll even pay the sales tax and shipping, if you can’t come by to pick it up.

Cafe received this advance email note and unsolicited testimonial – “I have looked at it and  couldn’t put it down at “Beyond the Sea” and can’t wait for his signing there Saturday Nov. 1.  I love his sense of humor, the illustrations and photos and his sense that he really needed to get this into a book.  Good job, David!”             Dianne Horton

Book discussions & signings are scheduled for:

Penobscot Marine Museum Store, Main Street in Searsport, on Thursday October 16, 7 to 9 p.m.

Carver Hill Gallery, 338 Main Street in Rockland, on Saturday, October 18, 1 to 3 p.m.

Beyond the Sea, at Lincolnville Beach, on Saturday, November 1,1 to 3 p.m.

Fall Family Festival at the Farnsworth

Farnsworth Art Museum

On Saturday, October 18, from 3 to 6 p.m., the Farnsworth Art Museum’s sculpture garden will be transformed into the Fall Family Festival grounds. There will be free-style pumpkin carving, face painting, crafts, and live music. Families will be able to have a tin-type picture taken and will be able to watch the movie It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown in the museum auditorium.

Beginning at 5:15 p.m., a parade will take place on Main Street, departing from the sculpture garden. Families are invited to participate in the parade by wearing costumes and masks. Some masks will be made available thanks to Shoestring Theater, which will be teaching an after- school workshop the week leading up to the festival and parade. Grab a noisemaker, borrow a mask, and join in the fun! Immediately following the parade, the group will return to the sculpture garden for the lighting of the pumpkins. In case of rain, activities will take place in the Gamble Education Center, located at the corner of Grace and Union Streets. Please call (207) 596-0949 with any questions or see farnsworthmuseum.org/children-family-programs.

Farnsworth Art Museum

PMA Presents “What Are They Wearing?!?! Fashion and Identity in British Portraits”

Portland Museum of Art

On Thursday, October 9 from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., the Portland Museum of Art (PMA) will present the lecture, “What are they Wearing?!? Fashion and Identity in British Portraits” given by Amelia Rauser, Franklin & Marshall College Associate Professor of Art History. The lecture is $10 and free for PMA members. For more information, visit portlandmuseum.org.

Rauser’s lecture will focus on the portraits in the exhibition Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection and the clothes the sitters are wearing. Clothing from the Renaissance to the 18th century expressed cultural norms that indicated character and individuality. This talk will look at fashion and its history with special attention to how gender and class are conveyed through clothing. Rauser is the author of Caricature Unmasked: Irony, Authenticity, and Individualism in Eighteenth-Century English Prints (2008), which examines the origins of political caricature in 18th-century England. Her new project, Living Statues: Neoclassical Culture and Fashionable Dress in the 1790s-London, Paris, Naples, is a study of the emergence of a radical style of undress in the 1790s and its connection to contemporary aesthetic, political, and scientific thought.

Watercolor Workshop at the Farnsworth

On three consecutive Fridays, beginning on October 17, the Farnsworth Art Museum will present a watercolor workshop, taught by Lesia Sochor. The workshop, entitled An Introduction to Watercolor, will take place from 9 a.m. to noon at the Gamble Education Center, on the corner of Grace and Union Streets in Rockland.

In this 3-week introductory class, students will explore watercolor’s transparent qualities. Participants will learn about washes, gradations, tonal values, manipulating and controlling the medium while being open to its endless surprises.

Farnsworth Art Museum“Summer Mist” by Lesia Sochor

Artist Lesia Sochor is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Art and is an enthusiastic teacher who believes anyone has the ability to create. She has lived, painted and exhibited in Maine for 34 years.

 

Designing Women Fine Art and Craft show at Husson

The highly anticipated Designing Women Fine Art and Craft show will again be at Husson University, Saturday, November 1. This small and intimate show hosts some of the best female artisans in New England and promises to present many treasures for home, gift and self.

Designing Women is a nonprofit volunteer organization that has been bridging art and community since 1991. The group sponsors shows featuring female artisans from New England and works directly with other local non-profits that benefit women and girls in the community. The benefiting non-prophet for this show is Caring Connections. The show runs from 9-4 on Saturday, in the Center for Family Business building on the Husson University campus. For more information see designingwomen.org

Yikes!StudioPods Blossoms Necklace by Suzanne Anderson

 

Art House Picture Frames celebrates August with Joshua Ferry

Autumn is fast upon us! The wheel of the year keeps on turning. It’s difficult to believe that summer is rapidly coming to a close. But, there has definitely been a chill in the air and the leaves are turning rich hues of red, orange, and yellow. There is something about Maine during this time of year. The air is filled with the sharp scent of wood smoke and a hike through the woods is invigorating. Day and night are in balance and it is a perfect time to take stock of our lives and work at achieving a similar equilibrium.

Art House Picture Frames in Portland celebrates the shift in season and five years of business with an artist reception for Joshua Ferry on the October First Friday, October 3, from 5-8 p.m.

Art House Picture Frames on facebook

“August 4″ by Joshua Ferry

Joshua Ferry “August 6″ by Joshua Ferry

Art House Picture Frames is located at 61 Pleasant Street, in Portland. For more information call (207) 221-3443 or visit arthousepictureframes.com.

Salty Dog Gallery Presents “Adventures in India”

Salty Dog Gallery

The Salty Dog Gallery in Prospect Harbor will be displaying photographs by Dean Kotula for the duration of the season.

“Traveling in India is a thrill; it will enchant one moment and try your patience the next. India happens to you. You will learn to loosen up some of the controls you use to navigate life and come away with a fuller, deeper understanding and appreciation of not only yourself but other people and animals that share this planet. It will be unforgettable. At least this has been my experience and it is my privilege to share this adventure with you.”

The Salty Dog Gallery is a seasonal gallery located at 173 Main St. in Prospect Harbor. We deal exclusively in 20th century and contemporary fine art photography. For more information call (207) 963-7575 or visit saltydoggallery.net.

“Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection” On View at PMA

Portland Museum of Art

“Queen Elizabeth I” by Hans Eworth (English, born Belgian, circa 1520-1579)

This fall, the Portland Museum of Art (PMA) will showcase a rich survey of British art spanning six centuries in the exhibition Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection. Organized by the Denver Art Museum, the exhibition will feature 50 masterworks of British art by luminaries including Hans Holbein the Younger, Sir Anthony van Dyck, Thomas Gainsborough, Sir Thomas Lawrence, John Constable, Angelica Kauffman, and George Stubbs. The Berger Collection is one of the most impressive collections of British art in America and this exhibition provides audiences the rare opportunity to see such a significant body of paintings in this region. The PMA is the first venue in this traveling show, which will be on view in Portland October 2, 2014 through January 4, 2015.

With its diverse array of subjects and styles spanning six centuries of artistic practice, Treasures of British Art traces key developments in British art and culture through a chronological presentation of works. The earliest picture, a gilded altarpiece with a Crucifixion scene from circa 1395, is also an extremely rare surviving example of late Medieval religious painting—the type of object that was systematically destroyed in England when King Henry VIII broke away from the Roman Catholic Church. Portraiture has long been an important genre in British art, and this tradition is well-represented in the exhibition from the linear, decorative style of 16th-century portraits of Tudor royals and nobility, to the loosely brushed naturalism ushered in by Sir Anthony van Dyck and found in 17th- and 18th-century portraiture, to the expressionistic 21st-century image of the artist David Hockney by Adam Birtwistle. Marine paintings and landscapes of faraway places—including a monumental naval battle painting by Adriaen van Diest and a luminous harbor scene by John Constable—reflect not only shifting aesthetic approaches to the natural world, but also the importance of maritime life and overseas exchange in the history of the British Isles. History paintings, equestrian subjects, and other important genres of the British school in styles ranging from the traditional to modern round out the expansive breadth of the exhibition.

The Berger Collection is a major private collection largely of British art, with a small but significant group of works by artists of other schools, including the French artist François Boucher and the American Winslow Homer. The late William M. B. Berger and his wife Bernadette Johnson Berger began amassing this collection in the mid-1990s out of their dual passion for British culture and for art’s potential to educate. Now owned by the Berger Collection Educational Trust and placed on long-term loan at the Denver Art Museum, the collection continues to expand through new acquisitions. The British paintings, drawings, and art objects number approximately 200 works and span more than six centuries—from the 14th to the 21st century. The very best paintings from this extraordinary collection have been selected for the traveling exhibition to fulfill the Berger family’s mission of sharing these masterpieces with a wide public audience.

Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection is accompanied by a catalogue of the same title authored by Kathleen Stuart, Curator of the Berger Collection. This catalogue includes full-color plates and detailed entries on each of the works in the exhibition.

Marnie Sinclair “Making Sense of Climate Change Through Art”

Marnie Sinclair

“Nature has always inspired my art. I find her perfect balance, color combinations, textures, and designs especially intriguing, motivating me to try a wide variety of artistic expressions to speak to her grandeur.”

Marnie Sinclair’s traveling sculpture exhibit Making Sense of Climate Change Through Art attempts to ” incorporate Nature’s extreme beauty with a bit of tension from our careless abuse of our only home.” Marnie is looking for venues to display and discuss “balance, art and climate change,” followed by her movie,”Nature’s Spin Through Art,” which uses sculptu her sculptures to illustrate the story of climate change as told by three experts in the field, Bill McKibben, 350.org, George Woodwell, founder of Woods Hole Research Center, and Jerry Sullivan, retired Physicist from NOAA.

"Nature's Spin Through Art" on YouTube

“Nature’s Spin Through Art” on YouTube

Marnie Sinclair, from Damariscotta, ME, is a process artist who works in many different mediums. Sculpture is her preferred choice and she is currently working in copper trying to solve the many variables of kinetic sculpture. She recently moved from Martha’s Vineyard, MA where she was a videographer who created many videos about water issues on the island. She is an environmental activist who’s art work often reflects her concerns about climate change and how we are living in a non-sustainable way that impacts all life on the planet. Her three dimensional and two dimensional work has been shown extensively in the Boston area, as well as on the Vineyard.

Her bronze animal sculptures can also be seen at the Ducktrap Bay Trading Co. on Main st. in Camden, and she has recently joined the Pemaquid Group of Artists as a guest for the year, showing her oil paintings. That gallery is across from the Pemaquid lighthouse in Lighthouse Park, in Bristol, Maine. Marnie is also a member of The Bristol Road Galleries, a 4-gallery consortium of artists who are close neighbors.

9 Maine Artists in the Howard Hill Exhibition

The Harlow Gallery in partnership with the Kennebec Land Trust (KLT), presents a very special benefit art exhibition October 12 – November 1, 2014 at Slates Restaurant located at 167 Water Street. in Hallowell in celebration of the KLT’s pending acquisition of the Howard Hill property in Augusta.

A public reception at Slates on Sunday, October 12 from 5 - 8 p.m. will coincide with the opening of a related exhibition celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Kennebec Land Trust across the street at the Harlow Gallery. Welcome comments from Deb Fahy, Executive Director of the Harlow Gallery and Brian Kent, KLT President are scheduled for 6:30pm at the Harlow Gallery. The reception is free and open to the public, refreshments will be served, cash bar.

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Howard Hill consists of 164 wooded acres that serve as the scenic forested backdrop for Maine’s State Capitol. This ambitious project is part of KLT’s 25th Anniversary “Conservation Across Generations” campaign, and 50% of art sales from the show will benefit the Howard Hill project, with some artists donating 100% of sales to the project. An open call earlier this year invited Maine artists to create art depicting or inspired by the Howard Hill property environs, history and views from or including the hill. The work to be included in benefit exhibition was selected by a a group of jurors including Norm Rodrigue and Jane Davis from the Kennebec Land Trust, and Deb Fahy, Allison McKeen and Elena Kirillova from the Harlow Gallery. Artists whose work was selected for exhibition include:

Nancy Bixler of Hallowell
Angie Blevins of New Sharon
Ramona du Houx of Solon
Penny Markley of Winthrop
Nancy McGinnis of Hallowell
Robin Miller of Augusta
Johanna Moore of Farmingdale
Jane Page-Conway of Bowdoinham
Judith Schuppien of Pittson

Established in 1988, The Kennebec Land Trust works cooperatively with landowners and communities to conserve the forests, shorelands, fields, and wildlife that define central Maine. The Trust protects land permanently, offers opportunities for people to learn about and enjoy the natural world, and works with partners to support sustainable forestry and farming. KLT has partnered with landowners in 21 communities to protect more than 4,800 acres on 60 properties through land donations, fee purchases, and conservation easements. Volunteers have constructed 37 miles of trails on KLT land and developed informative brochures and maps of KLT properties that encourage visitors to learn about and enjoy Kennebec County’s natural landscape. Most properties are open to the public for walking, hiking, hunting, fishing, enjoying nature, and creating art! For more information, visit them online at tklt.org.

Wiscasset Art Walk highlights Watershed Center for Ceramic Arts

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Curious about how to throw a clay pot – or even what that means? Visit the pop-up gallery at 106 Main Street during the Wiscasset Art Walk on Thursday, September 25, 5 – 8 p.m., where artists from the Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts will be demonstrating wheel and hand-building techniques with clay. Watershed will also have a pottery sale, featuring the work of current artists-in-residence, Watershed staff, and nationally renowned clay artists.

The Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts was established in 1986, at a former brick-making factory, with a dual mission: to provide artists time and space to explore ideas with clay and to promote education and awareness of the ceramic arts among the general public. Watershed is located in Newcastle on a 32 acre campus that includes a 16,000 sq. ft. studio “barn” space and a state of the art kiln facility.

During the summer and fall, small groups of artists live and work at Watershed in a close-knit community with room, board, and 24/7 studio access. Artists come to Watershed to follow their own path of inquiry while benefiting from the wisdom and inspiration of other artists in residence. Watershed artists also provide clay education and creative experiences to diverse populations throughout Maine. For clay artists, Watershed offers workshops throughout the year and use of the kilns and studio spaces. Through their “Mudmobile” program, teaching artists bring Maine clay, tools, and glazes to off-campus sites for workshops, including community centers, senior programs, and public and private schools. Watershed has served over 1,200 clay artists and more than 20,000 children and adults through community education programs.

During the Wiscasset Art Walk, Watershed will feature their fall residents in their temporary gallery at 106 Main St. These dedicated ceramic artists come from as far away as Georgia, Nevada, and Oregon to spend six weeks ‘exploring mud’ and creating a wide range of ceramics during their time at Watershed. In addition to demonstrations, completed pieces will be on display to Art Walk visitors, and artists will be on hand to talk about their work, their technique, and the Watershed residency program. Artists include Alex O’Neal, Charal Hatfield, Jackie Sedlock, Kristina Hamm, Meredith Morten, Molly Allen, and Sarah Southwick.

Enjoy the vibrancy of Wiscasset Village during the last Wiscasset Art Walk of 2014! Galleries, artists’ studios, and most shops will be open from 5 – 8 p.m. to welcome visitors. Major Sponsors are The First, Carleton Realty, Ames True Value, and Carriage House Gardens; sponsors include Big Barn Coffee, Carl Larrabee Insurance Agency, and Fogg Art Painting Restoration & Custom Framing. For more information about participating in Wiscasset Art Walk 2015 as an artist, performer, volunteer, or sponsor, please contact event coordinators Lucia Droby at ludroby@verizon.net or Ann Scanlan (207) 882-8290.

Ocean House Gallery & Frame Grand Opening!

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Ocean House Gallery & Frame has been working feverishly to get the shop ready and now are excited to share the news that they are Officially Open For Business at 299 Ocean House Road Cape Elizabeth, ME 04107. Stop by anytime to say hello, or visit on facebook, and if you know anyone who needs framing done in the area, send them in their direction! Ocean House Gallery & Frame regular business hours will be: Wednesday – Saturday from 12 – 6 p.m. and by appointment.